Tails Blog

My dog jumps up on me

Steve Coppell - Sunday, February 20, 2011


Does your dog greet you by jumping up on you?

There are many ways we program both positive and negative behaviour in our pets, sometimes without  realizing we even do it. Consider this the next time your pup jumps up and you respond by giving your pet positive encouragement with a pat or hugs because as a pup this is cute. Your pup associates this practise with the positive experience and why wouldn't it continue to do this as it grows older.
Why do our dogs jump up on people?
Your dog might be seeking your attention and this method (jumping up on you) has worked for them in the past.
Dogs will jump up because they are excited to see us.
Also on rare occasions your dog can jump up to assert dominance.
What should I do about my dog to stop it from jumping up?
Start training your pet as early as you can. Prevent behaviour problems becoming engrained character traits.
If you can see your pet is getting ready to jump up on you, turn your back on them, don't make eye contact, or say anything, don't give them any attention! Wait for your pet to settle down. When they settle, turn and command them to sit. As long as they have learned this already, when they do, give them all the praise and encouragement they long for.

Crate a Dog

Steve Coppell - Thursday, February 03, 2011
Crate training your new pup will satisfy the dogs need for a den like enclosure. It is also a very effective way to house train your pup, because it takes advantage of the dogs natural reluctance to soil in its sleeping place.  It works well to minimise damage to your home and offers protection for your pup in your absence, by creating a safe enviroment, where he isn't exposed to household hazards like electrical wires, cleaning products, etc.<p />
A crate serves as a mobile home that can be moved from room to room as necessary, you will often find your puppy will quickly adopt this area as their own territory.<p />
It is also an effective tool if your pup or you need some time out, and will assist with creating essential routines during early puppy training.<p />
Encourage your pup with a treat in their crate at bedtime and pup will quickly associate the crate in a positive light.<p />
Make the crate puppy only territory and don't allow children to play in it.<p />
It is important to regularly put your puppy in the crate, as your puppy will need to have naps often during the day, its a good idea that these are had in the crate.<p />
Having crate trained my own pup, I have found it an effective method and would highly recommend it to all. 
Crate training your new pup will satisfy the dogs need for a den like enclosure. It is also a very effective way to house train your pup, because it takes advantage of the dogs natural reluctance to soil in its sleeping place.  It works well to minimise damage to your home and offers protection for your pup in your absence, by creating a safe enviroment, where he isn't exposed to household hazards like electrical wires, cleaning products, etc.<p />
A crate serves as a mobile home that can be moved from room to room as necessary, you will often find your puppy will quickly adopt this area as their own territory.<p />
It is also an effective tool if your pup or you need some time out, and will assist with creating essential routines during early puppy training.<p />
Encourage your pup with a treat in their crate at bedtime and pup will quickly associate the crate in a positive light.<p />
Make the crate puppy only territory and don't allow children to play in it.<p />
It is important to regularly put your puppy in the crate, as your puppy will need to have naps often during the day, its a good idea that these are had in the crate.<p />
Having crate trained my own pup, I have found it an effective method and would highly recommend it to all. 
Crate training your new pup will satisfy the dogs need for a den like enclosure. It is also a very effective way to house train your pup, because it takes advantage of the dogs natural reluctance to soil in its sleeping place.  It works well to minimise damage to your home and offers protection for your pup in your absence, by creating a safe enviroment, where he isn't exposed to household hazards like electrical wires, cleaning products, etc.<p />
A crate serves as a mobile home that can be moved from room to room as necessary, you will often find your puppy will quickly adopt this area as their own territory.<p />
It is also an effective tool if your pup or you need some time out, and will assist with creating essential routines during early puppy training.<p />
Encourage your pup with a treat in their crate at bedtime and pup will quickly associate the crate in a positive light.<p />
Make the crate puppy only territory and don't allow children to play in it.<p />
It is important to regularly put your puppy in the crate, as your puppy will need to have naps often during the day, its a good idea that these are had in the crate.<p />
Having crate trained my own pup, I have found it an effective method and would highly recommend it to all
<p />
Crate training your new pup will satisfy the dogs need for a den like enclosure. It is also a very effective way to house train your pup, because it takes advantage of the dogs natural reluctance to soil in its sleeping place.  It works well to minimise damage to your home and offers protection for your pup in your absence, by creating a safe enviroment, where he isn't exposed to household hazards like electrical wires, cleaning products, etc.<p />
A crate serves as a mobile home that can be moved from room to room as necessary, you will often find your puppy will quickly adopt this area as their own territory.<p />
It is also an effective tool if your pup or you need some time out, and will assist with creating essential routines during early puppy training.<p />
Encourage your pup with a treat in their crate at bedtime and pup will quickly associate the crate in a positive light.<p />
Make the crate puppy only territory and don't allow children to play in it.<p />
It is important to regularly put your puppy in the crate, as your puppy will need to have naps often during the day, its a good idea that these are had in the crate.<p />
Having crate trained my own pup, I have found it an effective method and would highly recommend it to all. 


Why Crate Your Dog?
<p />
Crate training your new pup will satisfy the dogs need for a den like enclosure. It is also a very effective way to house train your pup, because it takes advantage of the dogs natural reluctance to soil in its sleeping place.  It works well to minimise damage to your home and offers protection for your pup in your absence, by creating a safe enviroment, where he isn't exposed to household hazards like electrical wires, cleaning products, etc.<p />
A crate serves as a mobile home that can be moved from room to room as necessary, you will often find your puppy will quickly adopt this area as their own territory.<p />
It is also an effective tool if your pup or you need some time out, and will assist with creating essential routines during early puppy training.<p />
Encourage your pup with a treat in their crate at bedtime and pup will quickly associate the crate in a positive light.<p />
Make the crate puppy only territory and don't allow children to play in it.<p />
It is important to regularly put your puppy in the crate, as your puppy will need to have naps often during the day, its a good idea that these are had in the crate.<p />
Having crate trained my own pup, I have found it an effective method and would highly recommend it to all. 
Crate training your dog is a very effective way to house train your pup because it takes advantage of the dogs natural reluctance to soil in its sleeping place. It also works well to minimise damage to your home and offers protection for your pup in your absence, by creating a safe environment, where he isn't exposed to household hazards like electrical wires, cleaning products etc.



Create your pups own territory
 
A crate serves as a mobile home that can be moved from room to room as necessary, you will find your pup will quickly adopt this area as it's own territory.

Time out and routines
It is also an effective tool if your pup or you need some time out, and will assist with creating essential routines during early puppy training.



Helpful Hints for crate training your pup
Encourage your pup with a treat in their crate at bedtime and pup will quickly associate the crate in a positive light.
Make the crate puppy only territory and don't allow children to play in it.
It's a good idea to regularly put your puppy in the crate, as your puppy will need to have naps often during the day, it's a good idea that these are had in the crate, it becomes their bedroom, their safe place and a routine that is essential during their early months of training and development.



Where can I
 get one?
Just click on Precision Dog Crates at Tails to find out more.

Free Delivery

Take advantage of Tails free delivery offer, in most cases you will receive your purchase in 2 working days.


Puppy Training

Steve Coppell - Friday, November 26, 2010

Puppy School

There's no doubt about it , bringing home a puppy is an exciting time! But in order for your little friend to reach its full potential, you need to house train it and establish a routine, including daily sessions of play and exercise. Here are some helpful training tips and advise.

Puppies Need Structure and Consistency!

 

Resource Control and Leadership

Puppies need to see that people control their resources. This helps to make them feel safe.
Resources include food, sleeping place, toys, games and social interaction. If they recognise that people are good resource managers, it takes pressure off them. Puppies that do not percieve people to be good at controlling resources often try to take over control themselves. As they are not equipped to deal with such a responsibility, it usually results in decreased self confidence, various forms of inappropriate behavior and even anxiety.



Feeding Routine

The young puppy still needs small frequent meals, ideally three to four a day. Feed more or less at the same times every day. Start with a feeding ritual right from the start. It should to sit before it is fed, and the bowl should be removed within 10 to 15 minutes.





House Training Routines

Plan your day carefully so that you can take the puppy out to its potty spot shortly after it has awoken, after every meal and after physical activity. The potty spot should be easily accessible for the puppy. It should always be the type of surface that you would like it to urinate/ deficate on, for example grass, or soil.






Play Routine

Puppies love to play but need to know how to play appropriately, what to play with and how to control themselves during play. Regular play helps a puppy use up its (often excessive) energy.

Cleaning up after your pet

Steve Coppell - Sunday, October 17, 2010


Sometimes things dont go according to plan and your pet does leave its mark on your house but it is possible to oust those bad odours without too much drama or chemicals. Heres how.

1/Make a bucket containing Napisan and water.
2/Soak a cloth in the bucket and then sponge the area throughly with  the wet cloth.
3/Sprinkle some napisan powder over the area once all colour has disappeared from the stain.
4/Vacum the area when it is fully dry
5/If an odour still remains, spray the area with a spray pack containing a few drops of oil of lavender and water.

If an extra detterant is required, Tails have sprays designed to assist with this problem.

Sleeping with your best friend

Steve Coppell - Sunday, October 17, 2010


Lots of people sleep with their pets. In fact its estimated that as many as one in three of us share pillow space with our pet. For many, it is the secret deal we quite literally keep under cover. But by inviting our companion into the bedroom so they can sleep soundly, have we made ourselves too easy? No matter whether your mates sleep inside, outside or even between the sheets, look at what those arrangemments mean to the relationship between you and your pet.

Starting out
Young puppies and kittens are small, fragile and feel lonley when they arrive at their new home. So many of us feel we have to treat them to the full bed and breakfast experience. But is this comfy start neccessary or even smart? Well, it depends on two things:

The weather: Puppies and kittens not only lack body fat to keep warm, they also lack friends to cuddle up to. So if your area gets cold at night in winter,then bring them in from the cold. But where they go once they are inside is up to you.
And whether... this is what you want for life. Some people do enjoy letting their dog sleep in the bedroom (or bed). And thats fine. But realise that what they learn as a puppy will be hard to shake. If you cant be there for them all day,every day then letting them sleep in your room while theyre a puppy only delays the inevitable heartbreak. Plus they are alot louder and more destructive when they go through seperation anxiety in their adolescence! So decide how you want your adult dog or cat to live, and start providing that lifestyle to your puppy or kitten from the start. It will be easier in the long run.


Smart alternative
A puppy or kitten pad in the laundry, bathroom or spare bedroom often makes the most sense. You keep the youngsters out of the cold draughts, out of the bedroom and most importantly out of hearing range during those early few first few nights. If your intention is for them to sleep outdoors as they grow older, extended periods of seperation or tough love at sleep time will make the eventual transition outside easier.
To try to make things more homely, try:
A bed: anything from a folded blanket they can push and shape into a comfortable nesting spot or an old duvee will do. Just make sure its up off the ground.
Food and water bowls: keep nearby.
Toys: keep nearby.


Dog Disease and Faecal matter

Steve Coppell - Friday, July 23, 2010

Dogs smell it, roll in it, walk in it, even ingest it. Dog faecal matter is often where dogs pick up serious disease. The following diseases are examples of disease spread in this way.



Parvo Virus
is one of the deadliest diseases in the dog poulation, particularly amoung puppies. Gaining entry through the mouth, the virus attacks the digestive tract and kills cells that are critical in the absorption of nutrients. Severe fluid loss through diarrhea and vomiting can lead to death. Parvo also temporarily affects a dogs immune system, and can lead to heart failure in some young dogs.



Whipworms
are blood suckers, tunneling into the wall of the intestine for their blood meals. Vomiting, diarrhea, and wieght loss are common symptoms and in large numbers, these parasites can cause anemia. Difficult to diagnose they are even harder to eliminate because they are often present in very large numbers.




Hookworms
are blood suckers, attaching to the intestineal wall where they suck plugs of the intestinal tissue into their mouth structures. Anemia and or intense inflamation can result. Hookworm infections can be passed on to humans.



Roundworms
can affect the lungs and the digestive system, with typical signs being vomiting and diarrhea.Convulsions can occur with heavy infections and the disease can spread to humans.



Giardia
are one celled parasites that can cause diarrhea in cats and dogs. Infection with giardia is often difficult to diagnose and treat effectively.



Coccidia
are also one celled parasites that can cause diarrhea, especially in puppies and kittens.

The best way to treat these, and the many bacterial infections dogs can acquire from stools is to remove faeces from your yard at least weekly, but more often if possible, and keep current on your pets vaccinations, and deworming.Try to pick up waste before a rain which breaks up or scatters the faeces and allows the worms or germs to spread into the environment.

Unrestrained pets in cars in NZ

Steve Coppell - Monday, July 05, 2010



We are often reminded about how important it is to buckle up. Social engineering, common sense, and hefty fines mean most of us now belt up in our cars without really even thinking about it. But how many of us consider the hazards unrestrained pets become when they roam free in the back seat.

Link to stuff.co.nz blog. Tails can offer you cost effective solutions so you can restrain your pets in the car.  Car booster seats, and Dog car harnesses, or Vehicle pet barriers are all good options for improved safety for your pet and for you in your car.

How to control litter box odor

Steve Coppell - Wednesday, June 30, 2010




There are a number of ways you can control litter box odour.

Clean the litter box regularly.
Cleaning your pets litter box is nobodys idea of a good time. But it is important if you want to keep those nasty odours under control.
Clear the box of debris daily, and change the litter at least once a week, depending on the material you use and the number of pets who use the box.

Ventilate the area
Make sure you park the box in a well ventilated area, preferabley close to an open window.

More litter boxes
Be sure to have enough litter boxes for the number of pets in your home.

Good Quality Litter
Buy a good quality litter like Silica litter crystals which is anti bacterial, absorbent, and has a deodouriser.

Teach your pet a new trick




Training puppy not to chew and destroy

Steve Coppell - Monday, June 07, 2010

 

 

 

What can you expect?

If you bring a new pup into your home and lives, teaching your pup what he/she is allowed to chew features as one of your earliest life lessons together.
My pup Jess took a fancy to power chords unfortunately. But by pure chance she came to no serious harm. But the same cant be said for my cell phone re charger, sub woofer power chord,an extension chord and two queen size electric blankets.

What can be done about puppy chewing?
1/ Puppy proof the confined area; If possible, remove all items your puppy can chew on, including socks, shoes, furniture, plants, etc.,from any area in which you confine your puppy. Make sure electrical chords are out of reach

2/ Confine your pup; in a crate, cage, or puppy proofed area when you are away. Because puppies learn with their mouths, giving your teething puppy free reign in the house is asking for trouble. Keep him confined; you do not want him to go to school on your expensive living room furniture. Make sure to supply the puppy with appropriate chew toys so the pup has something to do and teach the pup what to chew on.

3/ Closely supervise your pup.Not unlike caring for a toddler, you should always be aware of where your pup is and what he is doing.

4/ Give your pup chew toys; The sole focus of your dogs chewing should be directed toward items you select.There are a wide range of items from which to choose including many safe long lasting chew toys that are made especially for teething puppies that will keep them occupied and content for hours.Examples include knotted rawhide and durable rubber teething products, like Kongs toys, that satisfy your puppies need for chewing and gum stimulation. The items should not be similar to articles you do not want your pup to chew. Your puppy can not tell the difference between your new dress shoes and an old tattered pair.

5/ Make departures low key; to avoid causing separation anxiety, which is often expressed through non stop barking, whining, or destructive chewing. Before you leave, add your scent to your dogs toy. Rub the bone between your hands and give it to your pup 15 minutes before you leave.This should keep  the puppy occupied so you can leave without a fuss being made.

6/ Give your pup plenty of exercise; to relieve boredom and burn off energy- two significant factors contributing to destructive chewing.

7/ Correct chewing of appropriate objects; if you catch your pup in the act of chewing anything but his chew toy, remove the object and replace it with an acceptable chew toy. If your pup  then chews on the toy, praise him. You always want to reinforce desired behaviour with praise. If possible, treat the inappropriate object with a product designed to deter chewing.

8/ Teach your pup to ignore non toy objects;if he consistently chews the wrong things. Place tempting objects on the floor along with your pups chew toy and pretend not to pay attention to him. If (and usually when) he starts to put his mouth over one of the forbidden objects, correct with a firm No! and point out his bone. Once  he learns  he can only have the toy when you are in the room, it is time to leave the room for short intervals.

If he chews on forbidden objects after you leave the room, your quick return will catch him in the act - the only time when corrective action should be taken. Again, give him the toy, and praise if it is accepted.If he is chewing forbidden objects but you cannot catch him, he should be crated when unsupervised until he learns what is and is not acceptable to chew on. Make sure to leave several appropriate dog toys accessible at all times. It helps to have a certain location such as a basket that contains the dogs toys where he can go to get one when he wants.

 

My dog eats grass should I be concerned?

Steve Coppell - Saturday, April 10, 2010




Eating grass is basically a normal behavior for dogs, one which experts have given varying theories as to why they do this. Some believe that since dogs commonly vomit after eating grass, they eat grass in order to vomit. They may have an upset stomach or have eaten something bad and thus feel compelled to induce vomiting. Those who believe this think then that it's important that you not discourage your dog from eating grass when he feels so inclined.

Another theory is that, in the wild, the normal diet of canids like wolves and foxes includes grass, whether they're actively seeking it out or eating herbivores. Because of this then, grass can also be considered a normal part of a dog's diet.

And yet another theory is a rather simple one. Dogs eat grass simply because they like it. In fact, there may be certain species of plants and grasses that are particularly appealing to dogs. Unless your dog is eating grass excessively, it's really not a concern and you needn't be worried about it.