Tails Blog

Giving your pet their pill

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


One way to get a reluctant pet to take medicine is to open the animal's jaws wide and pop the pill in their mouth. Place it on top of their tongue, as far back as you can without causing discomfort. Then hold their jaw closed and massage their throat. Sometimes blowing a quick puff of air over their face is effective, (when they blink they swallow). Don't release their jaws until the pill is swallowed. Once you are sure the pill has been swallowed, let go of the jaw and watch to see that the pill doesn't get spit out. If it does repeat the exercise from the beginning.

Giving your pet the brush off

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


Brushing is probably the best way to promote a healthy shedding process in a dog or cat. Brushing not only removes loose hair, but it also stimulates the skin and enhances the natural shine of your pet's coat. Cat or Dog, if your pet has a normal coat and skin that's not sensitive, you'll probably want to use a wire brush. Especially if your pet is long haired. Try to brush at least twice a week. The more you brush, the less often you'll find clumps of fur clinging to your furniture or clothes.

My Kitten has Baby Blue Eyes

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


Are you delighted that your cat just gave birth to four kittens that all have blue eyes?
Don't get too excited; all kittens are born with blue eyes. Their true eye colour doesn't develop until they are several months old.

Pets and Bad Breath

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


Bad breath in pets is just as offensive as it is in humans. But besides being a turn off, halitosis can be a sign of a health problem. It may indicate an accumulation of tartar on your pet's teeth, which can result in gingivitis, or gum disease. ( Bad teeth and gums also produce bacteria that your pet will swallow, causing other health concerns). Or it may be a sign of digestive problems.
What can be done?
For tartar control, feed your dog or cat some dry food every day. Or give your dogs bones to chew.

4 ways to calm your new pups first night blues

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011



Imagine spending your first six to eight weeks of life with your mother, brothers and sisters. You have a mother that feeds you and looks after you and a constant source of playmates and warm bodies to sleep next to. All of a sudden, a strange smelling person picks you up and takes you away from your family. You are left on a bed or in a box without any of the warmth or safe smells and other comforts you have grown up with. Sound scary? Try these suggestions to make your puppies first night in their new home a little more comfortable.
1/  Purchase a heat pad or a hot water bottle and place it underneath a towel or their blanket.
2/  Give them something soft and warm to sleep on such as a old fleece jersey.
3/  Sometimes if you turn a radio on with the volume down low this will offer comfort.
4/  Ask the breeder for something that smells of the pups mother and siblings such as a piece of cloth or toy.

A purpose built dog crate is a good idea. This becomes their own bedroom space, that will also help with house training.
Regardless, be prepared for a few nights of unsettled sleep. Don't give in to constantly checking on your upset pup during the night. They quickly learn this is how to get your attention. Likewise be clear about their sleeping arrangements. Stick to the plan. You know who to blame if you come home to find them sleeping on your bed, ( if you let them sleep with you in your bed to begin with).

A bathroom on every floor

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


If your home is spacious, or if you live on two floors, it's a good idea to set up two litter boxes for your new kitten, one at either end of the house or on each floor. Not only will this be more convenient for your pet but it will also cut down on accidents.

Give that pup plenty to chew on

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


For teething puppies and many older dogs, chewing is an urge that's hard to resist, so make sure you provide your new dog with plenty of alternatives to your shoes or furniture. Offer them chew toys made of hard nylon, such as nylabones. Start right away to draw your pet's attention to their new chew toys and offer lot's of praise when they use them.

Plants and Ornaments for your fish tank

Steve Coppell - Saturday, June 11, 2011


For a well furnished fish tank , include plenty of plants, rocks or ornaments in the decor. The purpose is not just aesthetic. Fish like to have places to swim in and out of, where they can breed, hide from other fish, or just pass the time.

Keeping Bearded Dragons

Steve Coppell - Tuesday, May 31, 2011


The Beaded Dragon, it's not everybody's idea of the ideal  pet. But what a spectacular addition to any household. 

These fascinating creatures are cold blooded, so they need to regulate their body temperature. They do this moving about their habitat to find a balance in the temperature available to them.  Dragons can be trained from a young age to become use to being handled, and love to sit on their keepers knees, arms torso, basically anywhere that offers body warmth they can absorb.

Two species of Bearded Dragon are often kept as pets. The Eastern Bearded Dragon and the Central or Inland Bearded Dragon. They both originate from Australia.Their name offers clues about where they might be found in their natural habitat.



Housing
If your serious about taking on one of these for a pet, consider their housing needs. Glass tanks work well. The size of the terrarium needs to be big enough to allow for  growth and development in later years, and dragons need to be able move to and from their source of heat as it is required. 

Lighting
There are three important light features your dragon requires for it's on going health and well being. Dragons like to laze about in the sun like the rest of us do, but they do it because the suns rays provide UVA, UVC and UVB. 
UVA is the visible light range, and is responsible for feeding and normal active behaviour. UVB can't be seen but it is important for synthesis of vitamin D3, which helps process calcium and prevents metabolic bone disease.
Purchase a purpose designed bulb that offers light with high UVB output! Your garden variety light bulb just doesn't do it for your pet dragon. Use one of these and health issues will quickly become apparent. Also take care to replace that bulb as the manufacturer requires because as time goes on the UV levels the bulb emits reduces.
How much light does my Dragon need? 
As a rule turn the light on when you get up in the morning  and off again at night when you go to bed.

Heating

Optimum temperature in your dragons terrarium ranges between 35 and 40 degrees Celsius. Set up your heat source at one end of the habitat and your dragon will move to and from it as required. 
You can use Infrared Bulbs or Ceramic Heat Emitters to heat the habitat. You must use a probe thermostat with either of these to regulate the heat and avoid overheating the terrarium or your dragon. Also the heat source needs to be housed inside a mesh cage to prevent serious burns to you or your pet if it gets to close.



Inside your terrarium

Place a basking rock close to the heat source. Dragons like to climb so it' s a good idea to provide a branch for them to climb. You can purchase ledges that stick to the side of your glass enclosure using strong magnets. Also plastic plants that stand up to the test of time and hungry Bearded Dragons. 



Feeding
Make enough fresh vegetable salad for three days. Toss Reptile Calcium Powder sparingly through the salad and spray Liquid vitamin for Reptiles. These are great supplements to consider using, and keep it in a sealed container in the fridge. Provide fresh water and fresh vegetable salad in the morning (throw out the leftovers). 
During the day you can leave a dish with freeze dried crickets or Flukers Bearded Dragon Diet and in the evenings feed gourmet foods and put any live food inside the enclosure for them to hunt.





Dog takes owner for a walk

Steve Coppell - Sunday, April 17, 2011


 



Who walks who?
Untrained dogs will often pull on their lead. This experience hinders your daily walk and quickly turns this quality time with your pet into a chore.
Anyone who has tried to restrain an untrained dog with a choke chain will tell you it simply doesn't work effectively, and that their pet would pull on a choke chain. In some cases till its oxygen supply is cut long enough that it lapses into unconscious.

What can I use to help prevent this? 
Purchase a gentle leader. This product  works immediatly, regardless of breed, size, age, or experience.
It`s design encourages calm and restraint when walking your dog.

How does it work?

<p />
Who walks who? <p />
Untrained dogs will often pull on their lead. This experience hinders your daily walk and quickly turns this quality time with your pet into a chore.<p />
Gentle leaders work immediatly, regardless of breed, size, age, or experience.<p />
It`s design encourages calm and restraint.<p />
The gentle leader is not a muzzle.<p />
When properly fitted, a dog can open its mouth to eat, drink, pant, fetch, and bark.<p />
It works by applying gentle pressure on calming points, and eliminating uncomfortable pressure on the throat.<p />
Anyone who has tried to restrain an untrained dog with a choke chain will tell you it simply doesnt work effectively, and that their pet would pull on a choke chain. In some cases till its oxygen supply is cut long enough that it lapses into unconscious.<p />
The gentle leader is an effective tool for training unwanted behaviors that range from leash pulling, lunging, to barking, jumping, chasing, digging etc.<p />
We encourage dog owners to train their pets with this product.<p />
<p />
The gentle leader allows owners to communicate with their pet in a way that dogs instinctively understand. The nose loop encircles the dogs muzzle. When light pressure is applied to the muzzle, your dog recognises this response, that it's place as the leader of the pack has been checked! The urge to pull in front will decrease. You are now the leader of pack.

 

The gentle leader is not a muzzle.
When properly fitted, a dog can open its mouth to eat, drink, pant, fetch, and bark.
The gentle leader is an effective tool for training unwanted behaviours that range from leash pulling, lunging, to barking, jumping, chasing, and digging.  We encourage dog owners to train their pets with this product.




Where can I get one?
Tails can sell you a gentle leader delivery free. We usually deliver in two working days. If you want to know more, just click on Gentle Leader for my dog.
We have a size to suit your dog.